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anonymous

"My Library" on Android devices - 7 views

It would be nice to have an option to filter between Bookmarks, Notes and Images when browsing "My Library" on android devices or have more options to point to this type of filters on the toolbar b...

android powernote filter content type brainstorm

started by anonymous on 30 Dec 11 no follow-up yet
Graham Perrin

Twitter use of bit.ly mars the TinyURL route to Diigo Meta - 4 views

  • invitation to Google Wave in exchange for development of one simple web page
  • http://bit.ly/3Ippag
    • Graham Perrin
       
      I didn't want this shortening. I already had a short URL from TinyURL.
    • Graham Perrin
       
      bit.ly issues a warning against http://bit.ly/3Ippag No thanks to Twitter. No thanks to bit.ly
  •  
    In a Tweet, I used the TinyURL of a Diigo Meta page. Twitter ignored my paste, over-wrote it with a bit.ly URL that warns users against proceeding. No thanks for breaking my Tweet, kthxBYE Twitter and I must think twice before using it for sharing URLs. (Identi.ca running StatusNet worked first time. Oh hai Identi.ca kisses.)
Wade Ren

Scraping content and adding it to a bookmark - 80 views

Glenn Berkshier wrote: > So how long is a page cached? indefinitely. > > I still think if you would allow users to copy content like ClipMarks, you would have a killer feature. Combining someth...

content scrape web

Ole C  Brudvik

Museum 2.0: Hierarchy of Social Participation - 0 views

  • Level 4: Individual, Networked, Social Interaction with Content (Me to We with Museum) This is the level where web 2.0 sits. Individuals still do their interacting with the content singly, but their interactions are available for comment and connection by other users. And the architecture promotes these connections automatically. For example, on Netflix, when you rate a movie highly, you don’t just see how others have rated it; Netflix recommends other movies to you based on what like-minded viewers also rated highly. By networking the ratings, tags, or comments individuals place on content, individuals are linked to each other and form relationships around the content. A successful level 4 experience uses social interaction to enhance the individual experience; it gets better the more people use it. The social component is a natural extension of the individual actions. Which means, perhaps, users are ready for…
  • As always, comments are encouraged—and in this case, strongly desired as I work on refining this content for the article.
  • using web 2.0 to promote civic discourse in museums, I’m developing an argument about the “hierarchy of social participation.” I believe that, as with basic human needs, experience design in museums (and for other content platforms) can occur on many levels, and that it is hard to achieve the highest level without satisfying, or at least understanding, those that come before it. One of the impediments to discourse in museums is that fact that designers want to jump straight from individuals interacting with content to interacting with each other. It’s a tall order to get strangers to talk to each other, let alone have a meaningful discussion. And so, I offer the following hierarchy of social participation.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Level 5: Collective Social Interaction with Content (We in Museum) This is the holy grail of social discourse, where people interact directly with each other around content. Personal discussions, healthy web bulletin boards and list-servs fall in this category. Healthy level 5 experiences promote respect among users, encourage community development, and support interaction beyond the scope of the content.
  • So how do we level up? The good news is that moving up the levels does not require new content. At all levels, the interaction and participation can occur around pre-existing content. A lot of museums top out at level 2 or 3, imagining that offering people heightened opportunities to interact with content, or to create their own content, is enough. Granted, I’m not sure if social engagement is the goal for interactive designers. But with side benefits like deeper connection with the content, greater appreciation for the museum as a social venue, and heightened awareness of other visitors, it deserves a place at the drafting table.
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