Skip to main content

Home/ Ad4dcss/Digital Citizenship/ Group items tagged digital wellness digital communication

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Anne Bubnic

TextED.ca - 6 views

  •  
    Online resource from Canada for everything textual. Get the 411 on texting and relationships, including healthy vs. unhealthy relationships, how to deal with harassment, and how to cope with stress. Through a variety of games and activities you can test your texting knowledge, find out how to use this great technology safely, and learn what to do when someone crosses the line. Educators can sign up for teacher guides and lesson plans.
Anne Bubnic

How much can texting hurt? - 0 views

  •  
    Move over, "texting thumb." A study came out this week about the rise of another physical ailment related to too much texting. Called cubital tunnel syndrome (CTS), it's basically a very unfunny funny bone: it occurs when a pencil-thick nerve gets pinched at the elbow. While it's not a new ailment-those of us over 30 call it tennis elbow-it's another reason to keep tabs on the volume of texts and Tweets your teens are tapping out. CTS is appearing more frequently in teens who keep their elbows bent while holding their cell phones or PDAs.
Anne Bubnic

Texting May Be Taking a Toll on Teenagers - 0 views

  • The phenomenon is beginning to worry physicians and psychologists, who say it is leading to anxiety, distraction in school, falling grades, repetitive stress injury and sleep deprivation.
  • Psychologists expect to see teenagers break free from their parents as they grow into autonomous adults, Professor Turkle went on, “but if technology makes something like staying in touch very, very easy, that’s harder to do; now you have adolescents who are texting their mothers 15 times a day, asking things like, ‘Should I get the red shoes or the blue shoes?’ ”
  •  
    Spurred by the unlimited texting plans offered by carriers like AT&T Mobility and Verizon Wireless, American teenagers sent and received an average of 2,272 text messages per month in the fourth quarter of 2008, according to the Nielsen Company - almost 80 messages a day, more than double the average of a year earlier.
JOSEPH SAVIRIMUTHU

Facebook friend saves suicidal teen on other side of the Atlantic - 0 views

  • A schoolboy who announced his imminent suicide on Facebook was saved when a friend across the Atlantic in America read his threat and raised the alarm.The 16-year-old, from Oxford, sent a late-night message on the social networking website to a girl sitting 3,400 miles away at her computer in Maryland. The teenager had been speculating about taking his life and shortly before 11.30pm on Wednesday wrote: ‘I’m going away to do something I’ve been thinking about for a while then everyone will find out.’
  •  
    A schoolboy who announced his imminent suicide on Facebook was saved when a friend across the Atlantic in America read his threat and raised the alarm. The 16-year-old, from Oxford, sent a late-night message on the social networking website to a girl sitting 3,400 miles away at her computer in Maryland.
Anne Bubnic

Searching for Solutions to Cyberbullying - 0 views

  •  
    This article, by John Palfree, is part of an online symposium on the First Amendment Center Online titled Cyberbullying & Public Schools. The author concludes that there is no easy answer to the problem of online bullying and that the most effective approach - education, with a view toward establishing positive social norms - is the hardest to accomplish. John Palfrey chaired the Internet Safety Technical Task Force in 2008. He is the co-author of Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives\n\n
Anne Bubnic

Videos - That's Not Cool - 0 views

  •  
    Videos From the National Teenage Dating Abuse Helpline targeting teens and covering topics such as electronic harrassment through excessive text messaging, badgering to send nude pictures and hacking the private spaces of others. Can be used as a springboard for discussion among kids.
Anne Bubnic

Today's Bullies - Tomorrow's Criminals? - 0 views

  •  
    Have you ever been the victim of a bully? Ever stand silent and let a bully pick on someone? Most people wouldn't consider bullying a crime -- but it could be creating criminals right before our very eyes. A study from a group called Fight Crime: Invest in Kids concluded that nearly 60 percent of boys whom researchers classified as bullies in grades 6-9 were convicted of at least one crime by the age of 24. And get this, 40 percent of those same boys grew up to have three or more criminal convictions. In other words, today's bully could be tomorrow's criminal.
Anne Bubnic

Bullying takes twisted turn for the worse - 0 views

  •  
    These recent headline-grabbing stories show a range of bullying behavior, from physical violence to a campaign of insults and intimidation to cyber-bullying, the latest method of bullying; Internet-aided, it can be used to manipulate, embarrass, harass, smear, taunt or threaten a student or stir up hate anonymously.
Anne Bubnic

Internet safety worries parents - 0 views

  • Parents are worried about a new form of stranger danger in the form of cyber-bullying - abuse through email, chatrooms or text messaging.
  • The issues around Internet safety often arose when adults such as parents or teachers did not understand the importance of the online world to their children. "You get children as young as 8 now who say, 'Take away my phone and take away my life'," he said. When children thought they would be restricted from the Internet and mobile phones if they reported bad experiences, such as bullying, they were less likely to report it, he said.
  • They said the worst part of cyber-bullying was the distance between the perpetrator and the victim. "They don't have to see the consequences if they post a comment or a picture in a chatroom," Hannah said.
  •  
    The world of chatrooms and instant messaging is foreign to many adults, but a British advocate for children's cyber safety says they need to understand its importance to young people.
Anne Bubnic

Eight Ways to Handle Cyberbullies - 0 views

  • 1. Identify and blockFirst, ask your child not to respond or retaliate, no matter how tempting it may be to fight back. If you can identify who's cyberbullying your child, block any further communications.
  • 2. Set boundariesYou, not your kids, should also contact the bully (or bullies) and demand the offending behavior stop
  • 3. File a complaint Most cyberbullying behavior -- harassment, threats, invasion of privacy, stalking -- are violations of a web site or Internet service provider's "terms of service."
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • 4. Contact the schoolIf you know the bully attends the same school as your child, teachers and administrators might be able to help.
  • 5. Send a certified letterIf you've done all you can and the bullying hasn't stopped, send the child's parents a certified "cease and desist" letter.
  • 6. Call an attorneyIn the worst case scenario, a lawyer can help you consider filing a civil suit against bullies and/or their parents for defamation, harassment or other causes.
  • 7. Contact the local policeIf there's any evidence that the cyberbully's tactics include criminal actions, such as hate crimes, physical threats or talk of brandishing weapons at school, contact your local police immediately.
  • . Talk with your kids about what's acceptableAnne Collier, editor of NetFamilyNews web site, an email newsletter about online safety for kids, says to truly stop cyberbullying, however, you have to first know what's happening when your kids are online.
  •  
    Nancy Willard and Anne Collier offer eight ways to deal with cyberbullies in this article.
    1. Identify and block.
    2. Set boundaries.
    3. File a complaint.
    4. Contact the school
    5. Send the parents a certfied "cease and desist" letter.
    6. Call an attorney.
    7. Contact the local police.
    8. Talk with your kids about what's acceptable.

Anne Bubnic

Cinema vs. Cyberbullies: Using Filmmaking to Fight Online Harassment - 0 views

  •  
    Excellent article in the June 2008 edition of Edutopia Magazine on the award-winning Cyberbullying Film Project of Debbie Heimowitz, Adina's Deck.
Anne Bubnic

10 tips for dealing with game cyberbullies and griefers - 0 views

  • Griefers are the Internet equivalent of playground bullies, who find fun in embarrassing and pushing around others.
  • Typical griefer behavior includes: taunting others, especially beginners; thwarting fellow teammates in the game; using inappropriate language; cheating; forming roving gangs with other griefers; blocking entryways; luring monsters toward unsuspecting players; or otherwise using the game merely to annoy a convenient target or to harass a particular player who has reacted to their ill will.
  • , griefers have some gaming companies concerned about losing subscribers. As a result, many game sites and providers are becoming less tolerant of griefers and are employing new methods to police for them and otherwise limit their impact.
  •  
    Known as griefers, snerts, cheese players, twinks, or just plain cyberbullies, chances are one of these ne'er-do-wells has bothered a kid near you at least once while playing online multiplayer video games such as Halo 2, EverQuest, The Sims Online, SOCOM, and Star Wars Galaxies.
Anne Bubnic

Griefers: Cyberbullying in the online gaming world - 0 views

  •  
    A griefer is a player who plays an online game simply to aggravate and harass other players. Griefers find fun in embarrassing and pushing others around in the online gaming world. They may use tools such as stalking, hurling insults, and exploiting unintended game mechanics.Griefers scam, cheat and abuse, often victimizing the weakest and newest players.
Anne Bubnic

NS Teens : Terrible Text - 0 views

  •  
    Latest video from NS Teens. Some teens say and do terrible things to each other online because they don't see the direct effects of their actions. So what should you do if you're cyberbullied? "Terrible Text" is about a young girl who is troubled when a cyberbully sends mean text messages to her cell phone at all hours of the day and night.
Anne Bubnic

Teen Harrassed By Older Men After MySpace Page Hacked - 0 views

  •  
    Latest story of an 8th grade student being harassed online after giving her password to some friends. After a falling out, they sabotaged her MySpace page, changed her password info and proceeded to post sexually provocative information.
Anne Bubnic

The Future of Reputation: Gossip, Rumor & Privacy on the Internet - 0 views

  •  
    Teeming with chatrooms, online discussion groups, and blogs, the Internet offers previously unimagined opportunities for personal expression and communication. But there's a dark side to the story. A trail of information fragments about us is forever preserved on the Internet, instantly available in a Google search. A permanent chronicle of our private lives-often of dubious reliability and sometimes totally false-will follow us wherever we go, accessible to friends, strangers, dates, employers, neighbors, relatives, and anyone else who cares to look.
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    John Paulfrey (Berkman Center) provides a review of the book, here.
  •  
    John Paulfrey (Berkman Center) provides a review of the book in his blog, here.
  •  
    John Palfrey (Berkman Center) provides a review of the book on his blog, here.
Anne Bubnic

Exposed: Blog-Post Confidential - 0 views

  •  
    [NYT Magazine, 5/25/08]. Examination of why people "overshare" their personal information on the internet through the eyes of a 20-something woman who compulsively blogs. This is a fruitful article to seed a discussion of how teens express themselves digitally and the importance of privacy and self-regulation. It could also be paired nicely with the Youth Privacy site ( previously bookmarked by another group member) for discussion in a digital citizenship class.
Anne Bubnic

Parents are in the Dark: What Kids Really Do Online - 1 views

  •  
    U.S. moms and dads estimate that their children spend only two hours a month on the internet, but kids say they actually spend 10 times more time - or 20 hours - according to a recent study, the first Norton Online Living Report by Symantec (via MarketingCharts). 41% of respondents age 13-17 say their parents have no idea what they do online, and only 33% of parents worldwide say they set parental controls and monitor their children's online activities.
Carla Arena

Let's Fight It Together [video] - 0 views

  •  
    I thought this video would REALLY interest you all. moving, appaling. This kid is in our classrooms. via http://thinklab.typepad.com/think_lab/2008/05/you-know-this-k.html
Anne Bubnic

bNetS@vvy [bi-monthly publication] - 0 views

  •  
    Excellent bi-monthly publication with articles from experts in the field. Two of the recent issues have been devoted to cyberbullying topics. Each issue covers the topics from multiple views.
1 - 20 of 46 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page